travel

Noun 1. travel - the act of going from one place to anothertravel – the act of going from one place to another; “he enjoyed selling but he hated the travel”movement, move, motion – the act of changing location from one place to another; “police controlled the motion of the crowd”; “the movement of people from the farms to the cities”; “his move put him directly in my path”walk – the act of walking somewhere; “he took a walk after lunch”circumnavigation – traveling around something (by ship or plane); “Magellan’s circumnavigation of the earth proved that it is a globe”roving, vagabondage, wandering – travelling about without any clear destination; “she followed him in his wanderings and looked after him”driving – the act of controlling and steering the movement of a vehicle or animalair travel, aviation, air – travel via aircraft; “air travel involves too much waiting in airports”; “if you’ve time to spare go by air”stage, leg – a section or portion of a journey or course; “then we embarked on the second stage of our Caribbean cruise”on the road, on tour – travelling about; “they took the show on the road”; “they lost all their games on the road” 2. travel - a movement through space that changes the location of somethingtravel – a movement through space that changes the location of somethingmotion, movement – a natural event that involves a change in the position or location of somethingascension – (astronomy) the rising of a star above the horizoncirculation – free movement or passage (as of cytoplasm within a cell or sap through a plant); “ocean circulation is an important part of global climate”; “a fan aids air circulation”creep – a slow longitudinal movement or deformationgravitation – movement downward resulting from gravitational attraction; “irrigation by gravitation rather than by pumps”levitation – movement upward in virtue of lightnessfall – a movement downward; “the rise and fall of the tides”flow, flowing – the motion characteristic of fluids (liquids or gases)spread, spreading – process or result of distributing or extending over a wide expanse of spacestampede – a wild headlong rush of frightened animals (horses or cattle) 3. travel - self-propelled movementtravel – self-propelled movement    movement, move, motion – the act of changing location from one place to another; “police controlled the motion of the crowd”; “the movement of people from the farms to the cities”; “his move put him directly in my path”brachiation – swinging by the arms from branch to branchwalk, walking – the act of traveling by foot; “walking is a healthy form of exercise”step – the act of changing location by raising the foot and setting it down; “he walked with unsteady steps”gait – a horse’s manner of movingrunning, run – the act of running; traveling on foot at a fast pace; “he broke into a run”; “his daily run keeps him fit”crawling, creeping, crawl, creep – a slow mode of locomotion on hands and knees or dragging the body; “a crawl was all that the injured man could manage”; “the traffic moved at a creep”circle, lap, circuit – movement once around a course; “he drove an extra lap just for insurance”dance step, step – a sequence of foot movements that make up a particular dance; “he taught them the waltz step”stroke – any one of the repeated movements of the limbs and body used for locomotion in swimming or rowing Verb 1. travel - change locationtravel – change location; move, travel, or proceed, also metaphorically; “How fast does your new car go?”; “We travelled from Rome to Naples by bus”; “The policemen went from door to door looking for the suspect”; “The soldiers moved towards the city in an attempt to take it before night fell”; “news travelled fast”circulate, go around, spread – become widely known and passed on; “the rumor spread”; “the story went around in the office”carry – cover a certain distance or advance beyond; “The drive carried to the green”ease – move gently or carefully; “He eased himself into the chair”whish – move with a whishing sound; “The car whished past her”float – move lightly, as if suspended; “The dancer floated across the stage”swap – move (a piece of a program) into memory, in computer scienceseek – go to or towards; “a liquid seeks its own level”whine – move with a whining sound; “The bullets were whining past us”fly – be dispersed or disseminated; “Rumors and accusations are flying”ride – move like a floating object; “The moon rode high in the night sky”come – cover a certain distance; “She came a long way”ghost – move like a ghost; “The masked men ghosted across the moonlit yard”travel – undergo transportation as in a vehicle; “We travelled North on Rte. 508”wend – direct one’s course or way; “wend your way through the crowds”do – travel or traverse (a distance); “This car does 150 miles per hour”; “We did 6 miles on our hike every day”raft – travel by raft in water; “Raft the Colorado River”get about, get around – move around; move from place to place; “How does she get around without a car?”resort, repair – move, travel, or proceed toward some place; “He repaired to his cabin in the woods”cruise – travel at a moderate speed; “Please keep your seat belt fastened while the plane is reaching cruising altitude”come, come up – move toward, travel toward something or somebody or approach something or somebody; “He came singing down the road”; “Come with me to the Casbah”; “come down here!”; “come out of the closet!”; “come into the room”move, displace – cause to move or shift into a new position or place, both in a concrete and in an abstract sense; “Move those boxes into the corner, please”; “I’m moving my money to another bank”; “The director moved more responsibilities onto his new assistant”round – wind around; move along a circular course; “round the bend”trundle – move heavily; “the streetcar trundled down the avenue”push – move strenuously and with effort; “The crowd pushed forward”swing – change direction with a swinging motion; turn; “swing back”; “swing forward”rove, stray, roam, vagabond, wander, swan, ramble, range, drift, tramp, cast, roll – move about aimlessly or without any destination, often in search of food or employment; “The gypsies roamed the woods”; “roving vagabonds”; “the wandering Jew”; “The cattle roam across the prairie”; “the laborers drift from one town to the next”; “They rolled from town to town”take the air, walk – take a walk; go for a walk; walk for pleasure; “The lovers held hands while walking”; “We like to walk every Sunday”meander, thread, wind, wander, weave – to move or cause to move in a sinuous, spiral, or circular course; “the river winds through the hills”; “the path meanders through the vineyards”; “sometimes, the gout wanders through the entire body”spirt, spurt, forge – move or act with a sudden increase in speed or energycrawl, creep – move slowly; in the case of people or animals with the body near the ground; “The crocodile was crawling along the riverbed”scramble – to move hurriedly; “The friend scrambled after them”slither, slide – to pass or move unobtrusively or smoothly; “They slid through the wicket in the big gate”roll, wheel – move along on or as if on wheels or a wheeled vehicle; “The President’s convoy rolled past the crowds”glide – move smoothly and effortlesslybreeze – to proceed quickly and easilybe adrift, drift, float, blow – be in motion due to some air or water current; “The leaves were blowing in the wind”; “the boat drifted on the lake”; “The sailboat was adrift on the open sea”; “the shipwrecked boat drifted away from the shore”play – move or seem to move quickly, lightly, or irregularly; “The spotlights played on the politicians”float, swim – be afloat either on or below a liquid surface and not sink to the bottomswim – move as if gliding through water; “this snake swims through the soil where it lives”walk – use one’s feet to advance; advance by steps; “Walk, don’t run!”; “We walked instead of driving”; “She walks with a slight limp”; “The patient cannot walk yet”; “Walk over to the cabinet” 2. travel - undertake a journey or triptravel – undertake a journey or trip    tour – make a tour of a certain place; “We toured the Provence this summer”globe-trot – travel all over the world for pleasure and sightseeingsledge – ride in or travel with a sledge; “the antarctic expedition sledged along the coastline”; “The children sledged all day by the lake”navigate, voyage, sail – travel on water propelled by wind or by other means; “The QE2 will sail to Southampton tomorrow”trek – make a long and difficult journey; “They trekked towards the North Pole with sleds and skis”trek – journey on foot, especially in the mountains; “We spent the summer trekking in the foothills of the Himalayas” 3. travel - make a trip for pleasuretravel – make a trip for pleasure    travel to, visit – go to certain places as for sightseeing; “Did you ever visit Paris?”ply, run – travel a route regularly; “Ships ply the waters near the coast”commute – travel back and forth regularly, as between one’s place of work and homeperegrinate – travel around, through, or over, especially on foot; “peregrinate the bridge” 4. travel - travel upon or acrosstravel – travel upon or across; “travel the oceans”go, locomote, move, travel – change location; move, travel, or proceed, also metaphorically; “How fast does your new car go?”; “We travelled from Rome to Naples by bus”; “The policemen went from door to door looking for the suspect”; “The soldiers moved towards the city in an attempt to take it before night fell”; “news travelled fast”sail – traverse or travel on (a body of water); “We sailed the Atlantic”; “He sailed the Pacific all alone”ride – ride over, along, or through; “Ride the freeways of California”fly – travel over (an area of land or sea) in an aircraft; “Lindbergh was the first to fly the Atlantic”cruise – drive around aimlessly but ostentatiously and at leisure; “She cruised the neighborhood in her new convertible” 5. travel - undergo transportation as in a vehicletravel – undergo transportation as in a vehicle; “We travelled North on Rte. 508”go, locomote, move, travel – change location; move, travel, or proceed, also metaphorically; “How fast does your new car go?”; “We travelled from Rome to Naples by bus”; “The policemen went from door to door looking for the suspect”; “The soldiers moved towards the city in an attempt to take it before night fell”; “news travelled fast”fly – travel in an airplane; “she is flying to Cincinnati tonight”; “Are we driving or flying?”hop – travel by means of an aircraft, bus, etc.; “She hopped a train to Chicago”; “He hopped rides all over the country”ride – be carried or travel on or in a vehicle; “I ride to work in a bus”; “He rides the subway downtown every day” 6. travel - travel from place to place, as for the purpose of finding work, preaching, or acting as a judgetravel – travel from place to place, as for the purpose of finding work, preaching, or acting as a judgego, locomote, move, travel – change location; move, travel, or proceed, also metaphorically; “How fast does your new car go?”; “We travelled from Rome to Naples by bus”; “The policemen went from door to door looking for the suspect”; “The soldiers moved towards the city in an attempt to take it before night fell”; “news travelled fast”itinerate – travel from place to place, as for work; “an itinerating merchant”

Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

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